Spider Monkeys


Spider monkeys live in the tropical forests of Central and South America, from southern Mexico to Peru, Bolivia, and central Brazil. With four lanky, spindly limbs and long prehensile tails, which they use like a powerful fifth hand, these large and unusually nimble New World monkeys swing gracefully from one tree branch to another (a maneuver known as brachiation) in their daytime search for fruit—the mainstay of their diets. Spider monkeys have coarse hair; narrow, hook-like hands that lack thumbs; and small, hairless faces. In the wild, these social monkeys form groups as large as two dozen individuals; when threatened, they attempt to scare off intruders with vocalizations that may sound like anything from human shrieks to a dog’s bark and a horse’s whinny. There are seven species of spider monkey, two of which are designated as critically endangered due to such threats as human hunting and logging.



Resident

Chester is a former pet who arrived here in 2002 and has made his presence known: rowdy and disruptive, he’s an imposing force.

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Resident

Dehlia was given safe haven here in 2002 after being found abandoned in a vacant apartment. She arrived at the PRC malnourished and dangerously thin.

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Resident

Bisou is French for “kiss,” and there’s no mistaking why this small and shy gal is so named: when greeting someone, she often puckers up with a kiss-face.

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