Rescued: 1998

Victoria came to the PRC in 1998—along with Debbie (now deceased), Donald, Hazel, and Zulu—from Dahlonega, Georgia, where for decades they had been locked in a concrete bunker. As juveniles, Vicky and her companions moved freely about the rural property, treated practically as human children. Vicky wore pretty dresses, was taught to roller skate, and even sat for portraits at a commercial photography studio (activities the PRC strongly opposes). Yet for all their similarity to humans, chimpanzees are wild animals—big, imposing, and intelligent wild animals. So when Vicky and her cohorts finally became too big and too imposing, they were locked away.

This life change was apparently hardest on Vicky. The least dominant of the five, she had received little food in her former home. And because their diet had consisted primarily of highly processed junk food, she received inadequate nutrition and was severely malnourished. Upon her arrival at the PRC, she was a living skeleton, her coat sparse and gray rather than thick and black. What’s more, Vicky’s feet were severely deformed, making it difficult for her to climb around like a normal chimp.

Fortunately, it did not take long for Vicky to recover physically once she settled in here. She is now strong and healthy, and has nearly doubled her weight. She has formed strong relationships with most of the other chimps, and is protective and loyal to her closest friends, Hazel and Zulu. Vicky’s relationships with her human caretakers took more time to develop, but after much patience Vicky now occasionally craves their attention (usually when they have a treat in hand).

Vicky has a tendency to be a overly dramatic, and is easily upset when the boys play too rough or when another chimp gets a treat she wants. Most of the time, however, she likes to take it easy and is content to spend time with her companions. She enjoys building a soft bed to nap in for the day, and loves receiving paper or burlap bags from her caretakers to make it even more comfortable.

Happy World Chimpanzee Day!

Today is World Chimpanzee Day – a day to celebrate all chimpanzees, wild and captive. We want to spend today highlighting and honoring the nine chimpanzees who call the PRC home! Each chimp is a unique individual with their own likes, dislikes and interests, and we...

Fall Fun at the PRC

Fall is upon us. The shortened days, crisp, cooler air, and the changing landscape from bold green to shades of warm amber, deep scarlet and sepia gold mark the beginning of many changes and inspirations at the sanctuary. The nutrition and enrichment programs at...

Sharing the Love

Happy Valentine’s Day! At the Primate Rescue Center, we are so fortunate to have supporters who show us love. Whether it’s by sharing our social media posts, donating to our fundraisers or sending goodies for the primates – we feel the love! We are so grateful and...

Hooray for Whole Foods!

We are so pleased to now be partnering with our local Whole Foods store located in the Summit at Fritz Farm. We go through a lot of food each week to feed the 9 chimpanzees and over 40 monkeys at the PRC and we are fortunate that a large percentage of their diet is...

Reading into the Chimpanzee

A primatology book analysis and comparison to the PRC's chimps by Taylor Luken. Five to seven million years ago in Africa, humanity (Homo sapiens) and the African great ape known as the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) ceased sharing common ancestors. Our evolutionary...

Merry Chimpmas!

If you follow the Primate Rescue Center on social media, you probably know that every year around Christmas we like to put together a “Chimpmas list” for the chimps! This year the chimps thought long and hard about what they would like, and then...

Spring Fever

The chimps are kissing winter goodbye and embracing sun-filled days spent lounging, grooming and playing in their massive outdoor enclosure. What better way to ring in springtime festivities than by throwing the first outdoor chimp party of the season? Our...

The Dahlonega Five Chimps

We first learned about the five chimpanzees living in the hills of northwest Georgia in the summer of 1997. Kevin Ivester, a former board member of the Simian Society of America, explained that little was known about the animals because the owner kept to herself....