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Welcome to the Primate Rescue Center’s 2020 Virtual Member Event!

We are so glad that you have joined us to virtually tour the sanctuary, participate in our annual fundraising event, and see how your support is positively impacting the sanctuary residents and helping us to give them the life they deserve. Click below to view a video message from Executive Director Eileen Dunnington Dallaire, a video tour of the sanctuary grounds, as well as our sanctuary’s Frequently Asked Questions page. For the best interactive experience, we recommend using a tablet, laptop or desktop. Thank you for joining us for this exciting event, and we hope you enjoy visiting each click point on the sanctuary event map!

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Gift Shop

Click below to shop the PRC Gift Shop! You will find t-shirts, stickers, drinkware, and more!!
Note: Many apparel items (t-shirts, hoodies, etc.) will be printed on-demand. Please allow 7-14 days for processing and shipping.

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Silent Auction

The auction will close at 7:00pm on Saturday, June 27th. Click below to browse the items. You will need to create an account to begin bidding on items.

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Activities Area

Click the link below to find primate enrichment building, tasty recipes, coloring page, craft downloads, a PRC sounds activity, and some step-by-step videos in our Activities Area of the Virtual Event.

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Primate Pal Program

Becoming a PRC Primate Pal is a wonderful way to support your favorite sanctuary resident. Not only are you contributing to their care and supporting their life in sanctuary, but you also get to learn more about them and keep up with their activities through exclusive updates and photos sent to you via email or mail throughout the year. Click the link below to view a short video message about the Primate Pal Program, as well as a link to our Primate Pals page to get you started with your sponsorship.

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Donation Jar


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PRC Vehicles

Transportation to and from the sanctuary to pick up produce and other supplies is achieved by our large Sprinter Van, which has been modified to give us as much room as possible in the back for all of our transporting needs. The reliable, energy efficient and quiet electric utility feed cart is used to transport food and enrichment to all primate enclosures. The powerful but quiet electric utility vehicle is the newest addition to our vehicle team and is used for transporting and managing compost material and debris across sanctuary grounds and to our compost heap. Both electric carts were made possible by matching grants from the Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels Good Works Program.

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Memorial Garden

The Memorial Garden is a place to honor and remember the primates and animals we have rescued, cared for and lost over the years. The garden is decorated with a spiral of stones and beautiful flowering plants and displays etched river rocks with the names of the beloved residents who spent their final years living at the PRC.

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Annabelle

Annabelle is a female Great Pyrenees who guards the property and loves exploring the creek and forest around the sanctuary. She is energetic and friendly and loves for the volunteers to brush her long, white hair. Annabelle brings the care staff all kinds of treasures that she finds in the forest, depositing items in the middle of the field near the monkey houses each day.

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Pygmy Goats

The PRC is home to three pygmy goats – Roscoe (white with horns), Lonnie (brown and black), and Cinnamon (brown, white, and tan like a cinnamon roll). These boys have found goat heaven at the PRC, where they receive daily portions of goat feed, lush grass, hay in the wintertime, and special treats like carrots, apples, sunflower seeds, and strawberries. They have a rock hill for climbing, and the volunteers are sure to add a few extra climbing structures for them each week from our collection of plastic playground equipment.

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Peafowl

The peafowl who live at the PRC are free-roaming and choose to stay on the property year-round. The males are referred to as peacocks and the females are peahens. They are fed a diet each day of cracked corn, but mostly prefer to eat whatever fruits, veggies, nuts, and seeds the monkeys drop from their feed baskets and enclosures. In the spring, the male peacocks put on a big display to show off their long, beautiful feathers in hopes of catching a female peahen’s eye.

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Boiler House

This is the monkey heat boiler house. All primate indoor housing is heated by a boiler system powered by propane gas. The caregivers monitor the propane tank levels and boiler system daily during the fall, winter and spring months to ensure that everyone stays nice and toasty inside. Each year, the PRC uses over 5,000 gallons of propane with costs averaging over $10,000 to keep the monkey houses and chimp house warm for the primates.

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Chimp House

The Chimp House is the hub of all activities at the sanctuary. Inside is the main kitchen area where the primates’ food, donated from Whole Foods Market and three local Kroger stores, is stored and prepared. There is also a large room inside for housing special needs individuals. A smaller kitchen is also located in this building where medications are prepared and laundry facilities are located. This kitchen is near the chimpanzees’ Night Room and Play Room areas, which are joined by tunnels and can be segmented by the hydraulic-powered door system. The Play Room is outfitted with a jungle-themed mural (painted by local artists), firehose for climbing and lounging as well as benches to utilize for napping, eating, and sitting with their companions. The Night Room is an area with tunnels, mats, bedding materials and hammocks where the chimpanzees can peacefully rest, nap, and groom one another. A tunnel connects the Night Room to the chimpanzees’ expansive Outdoor Enclosure, where the chimps have room to roam, climb, forage and have fun with the platform climbing structures, firehose swings and hammocks, a huge net for napping, and custom-built enrichment feeder and feeding trays.

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Chimp Enclosure - Dahlonega Chimps

Three members of the PRC’s chimpanzee troop are the remaining survivors of the “Dahlonega 5”, a private ownership situation in Georgia where they had spent decades in dark, squalid conditions. In 1998, Donald, Victoria, Zulu, Hazel (who passed away in 2016), and Debbie (who passed away in 1998) arrived at the sanctuary needing immediate medical care and rehabilitation after enduring decades of malnutrition, dehydration, lack of sunlight or fresh air, and overall neglect in their previous situation. This tumultuous time resulted in physical and mental scars that remain with these individuals today. In 2000, once their health was stabilized, they were united with the young L.E.M.S.I.P. chimps into one cohesive group, resembling the social dynamic of a wild troop of chimps. This year marks 22 years of sanctuary for Donald, Victoria and Zulu. We can only hope that their years of sanctuary life will erase the decades of trauma they experienced before their rescue.

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Chimp Enclosure - LEMSIP CHIMPS

Primate Rescue Center is home to nine rescued chimpanzees, six of whom arrived from New York University’s Laboratory for Experimental Medicine and Surgery in Primates (LEMSIP), which was preparing to shut down. In 1996, Jenny, Cory, Noelle, Rodney, Ike, Martina (and Pozna who passed away in 2016), all arrived at the sanctuary when they were just babies. All had been separated from their mothers soon after birth to be raised in the laboratory nursery, leaving them to depend on each other for comfort and reassurance. They spent their first few years at the sanctuary energetically playing and learning about their new surroundings. In 2000, once the youngsters grew up a little and the older chimps’ health had been stabilized, the two groups were united into one cohesive group, resembling the social dynamic of a wild troop of chimpanzees. This year marks 24 years of sanctuary for this group of chimpanzees.

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Station One

Ciera and Luke Long-Tailed Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)
Rainey: Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

Ciera arrived at the PRC in 2004 from Indiana where she was kept as a pet. Rainey traveled here all the way from Idaho in 2014, after being turned over to a zoo by her owners following an incident where Rainey bit a child at a public park event. Luke is a former pet from Missouri who had been castrated and had his teeth removed by his owner in order to (unsuccessfully) “tame” him, but fortunately, he was turned over to the PRC in 2002. This trio loves to cuddle and hug and they get so excited for dinner time that they are often heard squealing with delight.

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Station Two

George: Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

George was confiscated by Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources in Fayette County and brought to the PRC in 2016 after having spent the first year of his life in a human home. George was initially introduced to Saidah (Barbary macaque) so that he could have a motherly influence as he matured. However, as George has grown and reached puberty, he and Saidah were no longer able to coexist peacefully. Saidah was incredibly important to George’s rehabilitation and recovery process by helping him learn many positive monkey behaviors and comforting him as he grew. Although they were not a permanent match, we are hopeful that we will find a new friend for George as he continues to mature.

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Station Three

Bisou, Dehlia & Chester: Spider Monkeys (Ateles vellerosus)
Jenny: Siamang Gibbon (Hylobates syndactylus)

One of our earliest arrivals, Bisou was picked up by California animal control and brought to the PRC in 1993. Chester is a former pet from Connecticut who was surrendered to the sanctuary in 2002 when his owners realized he needed primate companions. Dehlia was found abandoned in a Washington, DC apartment and brought here in 2002. Jenny arrived at the PRC in 1992 from a zoo in Missouri that no longer wanted to exhibit Jenny and her then companion Jason. Jenny loves hanging out with her spider monkey buddies and can often be seen with her long arms draped around their shoulders. This gang of primates all enjoy brachiating across the length of their enclosure and the spider monkeys use their prehensile tails to literally “hang out,” grab food, or snuggle with a buddy.

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Station Four

Bob: Vervet Monkey (Cercopithecus pygerythrus)
Hope: Japanese Snow Macaque (Macaca fuscata)
Junior: Long-Tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)
Vernon: Vervet Monkey (Cercopithecus pygerythrus)

These monkeys are individuals who need more specialized care and rehabilitation as they go through their recovery process. Some of these individuals have expressed that they are not yet willing to share their space with others as a result of the trauma they experienced as household pets. For some individuals, the rehabilitation and recovery process takes much longer--we never force individuals into situations that may be uncomfortable or intimidating for them. We never give up hope that someday they will be ready for a companion, and we are constantly evaluating their needs and make adjustments to their rehabilitation process when they are ready.

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Station Five

Saidah: Barbary Macaque (Macaca sylvanus)
Nikki: Vervet Monkey (Cercopithecus sabaeus)
Bubbles: Long-Tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)
Dewey: Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)
Harley: Tufted Capuchin Monkey (Sapajus)
Missy: White-fronted capuchin monkey (Cebus)

These monkey pairings are monitored very closely because of their unique situation or health conditions. Nikki is very young and needs a specialized diet to help her grow, and we are closely monitoring her and Saidah as they are in the initial introduction phase. Dewey is an elderly monkey who needs extra warmth, specialized care, and supplementation to his diet to keep him strong. Dewey and Bubbles live together and spend their days grooming each other. Harley is an insulin-dependent diabetic who needs daily injections to control his blood sugar levels. He and Missy have lived together for many years and enjoy grooming each other often.

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Station Six

Andi & Sissy: Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

Sissy was kept for many years as a pet in Lawrenceburg, KY, having been grandfathered in after the laws changed in Kentucky in 2005. Sissy’s care was transferred to the PRC in September 2019. Sissy is in the early stage of the introduction process to Andi, who was found roaming loose in a neighborhood in Bath County, Kentucky. Andi was brought to the PRC in 2015 after being captured by Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Because of the numerical tattoo on his chest, we know Andi spent some time in a research laboratory before being illegally kept as a pet. It is unclear whether Andi escaped the private home where he was living or was possibly abandoned by his former owners to fend for himself. We can only imagine how difficult his life must have been before finding sanctuary at the PRC. Although these two are still just in the earliest stage of their introduction (only visual access), we are hopeful that Andi is finally ready for a companion and that Sissy will be the perfect one for him.

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Station Seven

Maddie: Pigtail Macaque (Macaca nemestrina)
Jake: Japanese Snow Macaque (Macaca fuscata)

A former pet from Michigan, Maddie was turned over to the PRC in 2007 when she began exhibiting signs of stress due to lack of contact with other monkeys. Jake was captured by Cincinnati Animal Control while roaming the city in 2003. It is not known if Jake was abandoned or if he escaped from his cage, but luckily he was brought to the sanctuary where he has enjoyed a peaceful life ever since. We are thrilled that these two have hit it off, and we see that they are quite happy in each other’s company.

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Station Eight

Zoe, Opal, and Carlos: Long-Tailed Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

After living five years in a human home as a pet, Zoe was surrendered to the sanctuary in 2001 after she injured her owner in a violent attack. This type of behavior is quite common from primates forced to live in such an unnatural and stressful environment. Opal was rescued from a pet situation in Indiana in 2018. Carlos, one of the youngest residents at the PRC, was flown to the sanctuary from Texas where he was rescued from a college fraternity house in 2013. Opal and Zoe have lived together for several months now, and these girls are such a sweet pair – sitting together in the sun and snuggling up in their cozy indoor enclosure at night. Carlos has only recently been moved to their enclosure area, and they will soon begin the introduction process of meeting each other. We’re so hopeful that once all three are together, they will enjoy the new companionship and become another successful family group at the PRC.

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Station Nine

Maggie & Mandy: Crested Black or Sulawesi Macaques (Macaca nigra)

Maggie and Mandy are fun-loving and expressive girls. Maggie was rescued in 1998 and Mandy in 2005. They are both former pets who came to the PRC from Missouri, unfortunately a state with virtually no restrictions on the ownership of exotic animals. Their formidable presence soon caused each of these girls to outgrow their welcome as household pets. Today, this vocal pair is known for their friendly lip-smacking and chatty banter as they spend time grooming and enjoying their daily enrichment items.

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Station Ten

Bucky & Timmy: Long-Tailed Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

This pair of boys arrived at the PRC in 2013 after being kept together as pets just up the road in Lawrenceburg, KY. Once their former owner became unable to care for them, he decided to surrender them to the Primate Rescue Center where they would remain together and receive proper care for the rest of their lives. Both enjoy the morning sunshine, digging through their forage pool for tasty treats, and as always, each other’s company. These boys are very friendly and laid back and love to chat with their neighbors Bailey, Sawyer and Jane.

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Station Eleven

Bailey, Sawyer & Jane: Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

Bailey is a former pet whose owner sought to find her a new home where she could associate with other monkeys. Upon her arrival at the PRC in 2002 Bailey bonded closely with Dewey and, despite our multiple vasectomy attempts, still produced offspring. Although the PRC does everything possible to curtail breeding, these two foiled our attempts. Sawyer (2005) and Jane (2006) were born at the PRC and raised by their mother. When it became clear that Dewey could no longer keep up with the youngsters, we decided to place him with a different group. This family of monkeys is extremely loyal and loving, spending hours grooming each other or happily chatting about neighboring monkey drama.

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Station Twelve

Breanna: Rhesus/Long-Tailed Macaque (Macaca mulatta/Macaca fascicularis)
Caleb: Vervet Monkey (Cercopithecus sabaeus)

Caleb is a former pet who was brought to the PRC in 2011 when he was only 10 months old after being confiscated by Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources in Frankfort, KY. Breanna was kept as a pet in Kentucky and surrendered to the PRC in 2010 so she could have a healthier, happier monkey life. These two have been friends for a long time, having been companions several years ago and then spending time apart in different groups. Now reunited, Breanna loves to groom her handsome friend Caleb, and he enjoys having a lovely lady to dote on him regularly.

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Station Thirteen

Grady, Cysgo, Norman, Louie, & Peanut: Capuchin Monkeys (Sapajus)

All of these little monkeys were former pets. Louie, the alpha of the group, arrived from Virginia in 2004. Norman was confiscated from a home in New York with seven other primates in 2004. Cysgo was surrendered to the PRC in 2001 from Midway, KY. Grady arrived at the sanctuary in 2000 from Ohio. Peanut, the only female in the group, was rescued once an undercover detective in Rowan County discovered her in the home of a drug dealer. This active bunch get along great and are often observed hanging out in their “sky fort” at the top, far corner of their enclosure, cracking open nuts and seeds for a tasty snack, or cuddling in the tunnel with each other and a few blankets. Several individuals in this group still show signs of the trauma caused by maternal separation and will occasionally rock with blankets. However, the companionship of their friends and lots of enrichment activities greatly reduces these behaviors.

Note: Event map is not to scale and not a direct representation of the sanctuary.

Welcome to the Primate Rescue Center’s 2020 Virtual Member Event!

We are so glad that you have joined us to virtually tour the sanctuary, participate in our annual fundraising event, and see how your support is positively impacting the sanctuary residents and helping us to give them the life they deserve.

For the best interactive experience, we recommend using a tablet, laptop or desktop. In the menu bar above, you will find some of the event features, including the gift shop and silent auction. However, not all features of the interactive map are available on a mobile device.

Thank you for joining us for this exciting event!