Rescued: 1996

Cory was born on April 26, 1995, at the Laboratory for Experimental Medicine and Surgery in Primates (LEMSIP), a now-defunct New York University research facility. Like many chimpanzees bred for research, Cory was separated from his mother at birth and raised with other infants by human caretakers. This is extremely traumatic for a young chimpanzee, who in the wild would stay with his mother until about the age of 10. Fortunately for Cory, he has been able to remain with those he was raised with, and he also became very close with the adult chimpanzees he was introduced to at the PRC.

Upon their arrival here, Cory and the other LEMSIP youngsters were kept separated from the adults from Georgia—albeit in the same building—while their housing was being constructed. By the time the two groups were introduced, in August of 2000, they had lived in close enough proximity to be familiar with one another. Cory, in particular, seemed to immediately acclimate to the adults, becoming extremely close with the older gals, Hazel, Zulu, and Victoria. That’s entirely in character, as Cory has always seemed to understand the politics of chimp life: he aligned himself early on with the higher-ranking individuals, making it easier for him to start trouble without punishment or other consequences. But when he gets a little too rambunctious, he screams and lies belly down to show his submission. This usually puts a quick end to the quarrel.

Cory is very intelligent. We have often caught him waving his hand or an object over a sunny patch of concrete, seemingly observing the changing shadow. He figures out enrichment puzzles very quickly. He enjoys learning new tasks, and has been taught many hand and verbal signals. He seeks out humans for conditioning practice, during which a chimpanzee shows body parts upon request in exchange for a Tic Tac. This helps us to more closely observe them for injuries and general health. Cory obviously enjoys this interaction and the opportunity to use his brain.

Although Cory has always been quite small for his age, his exceptional intelligence and close relationships with the adults has given him high ranking. No one picks on Cory! In fact, we often wonder if he may eventually assume the alpha-male role, and watch anxiously as the drama unfolds.

Happy World Chimpanzee Day!

Today is World Chimpanzee Day – a day to celebrate all chimpanzees, wild and captive. We want to spend today highlighting and honoring the nine chimpanzees who call the PRC home! Each chimp is a unique individual with their own likes, dislikes and interests, and we...

Fall Fun at the PRC

Fall is upon us. The shortened days, crisp, cooler air, and the changing landscape from bold green to shades of warm amber, deep scarlet and sepia gold mark the beginning of many changes and inspirations at the sanctuary. The nutrition and enrichment programs at...

Fun in the Sun!

The hot summer days have arrived here at the PRC! With many days exceeding 90°, we are making sure all of the residents are staying cool and enjoying some summer fun. Noelle enjoys snacking on frozen slices of jackfruit.   Jenny runs through the cool mist...

Reading into the Chimpanzee

A primatology book analysis and comparison to the PRC's chimps by Taylor Luken. Five to seven million years ago in Africa, humanity (Homo sapiens) and the African great ape known as the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) ceased sharing common ancestors. Our evolutionary...

Unbreakable Bond

Zulu Chimpanzee is a former pet from Georgia who arrived at the PRC in 1998 as part of the Dahlonega Five. In this former pet situation, Zulu, along with Donald, Hazel, Victoria, and Debbie, was confined to a small, windowless concrete bunker for more than a decade...

A Mother’s Love

When we think of Mother’s Day, it’s usually a day to spend time with mothers and show them our appreciation and love. But not everyone is that lucky. Human, ape, and monkey alike, some of us aren’t able to be with our mother on this special day. Most primates...

Merry Chimpmas!

If you follow the Primate Rescue Center on social media, you probably know that every year around Christmas we like to put together a “Chimpmas list” for the chimps! This year the chimps thought long and hard about what they would like, and then...

The Importance of Grooming

Whether in the wild or in captivity, chimpanzees and monkeys spend a large portion of their time grooming one another. Grooming is not only a great way to keep everyone clean and comfortable, it is also a great way to build and maintain good relationships within a...

The LEMSIP Chimps

In 1996, New York University made the decision to close down the Laboratory for Experimental Medicine & Surgery in Primates (LEMSIP), which at the time housed nearly 200 chimpanzees and an even larger number of monkeys. All the animals needed to be...