Vernon is a male Vervet Monkey who came to live at the Primate Rescue Center in 2004. We estimate his birth year to be 1999. Vernon lived for years in the home of an animal hoarder in New York. He was housed in a small dog crate that was rarely cleaned. At the time he was confiscated, authorities found seven other primates living in the house, all in the same conditions as Vernon.

Because of his traumatic past, Vernon is very nervous around other monkeys and humans. Although he is currently housed alone, Vernon is still able to see and interact with the monkeys around him; however, he prefers to sit and groom by himself. He enjoys playing with his enrichment, whether it be scraping peanut butter out of a Kong toy or tossing and chasing plastic balls around his enclosure. Vernon loves to eat almost anything we serve him, but he is especially fond of corn, bananas, and peanuts.

The PRC’s Lifetime Care Promise

Jenny Siamang Gibbon was rescued by the PRC in 1992 and is estimated to have been born in 1971. The PRC's Lifetime Care Promise by: Melanie Parker Since its founding, the Primate Rescue Center’s mission has been clear – rescue, rehabilitation, and recovery of...

Orangutan drawings change with season and mood

She may not be Rembrandt or Pablo Picasso, but Molly the orangutan drew more than 1000 pictures over her lifetime. Now, one of the largest studies of nonhuman primate drawings to date—including hundreds of works by Molly and her ape companions at a Japanese zoo-reveal distinct individual differences in styles and ability. Some of the pictures appeared to change with the season, perhaps indicative of an orangutan’s mood.

Chimpmas Time is Here!

It’s that time again… The apes and monkeys have been good all year and are hoping that their Chimpmas wishes will come true! Everyone thought long and hard about what they would love most this year and we have put together their list here. Many of the items they...

The Social Primate

In general, primates are social animals. There are many benefits for being a part of a social system, one being protection. Of course, there are some exceptions to this general principle, for instance, the male orangutan, perhaps for the purpose of restraining the number of members competing for the same recourses, but this is not a common theme among the primate order.